An analysis of the structuralist theories of crime and deviance

All of the students want to succeed financially, and attending college is generally accepted as the first step toward that goal. They had the same goals as everyone else but were blocked from the usual means of achieving them.

Sociologists who apply this theory study social structure and social function. Five percent do not want to go to college, and the remaining five percent want to go to college but cannot, for any one of a number of reasons.

In a class of graduating high school seniors, 90 percent of the students have been accepted at various colleges. They may act out in a deviant manner. Deviance can also encourage the dominant society to consider alternative norms and values.

To progress, society needs a literate, highly trained work force. Its central idea is that society is a complex unit, made up of interrelated parts.

He identified four specific functions that deviance fulfills: In the aftermath of the attacks on September 11,people across the United States, and even the world, were united in their shock and grief.

Functions of Deviance Durkheim argued that deviance is a normal and necessary part of any society because it contributes to the social order. Institutionalized Means to Success In the s, sociologists Richard Cloward and Lloyd Ohlin theorized that the most difficult task facing industrialized societies is finding and training people to take over the most intellectually demanding jobs from the previous generation.

Unification of others in society: In order to compete in the world marketplace, a society must offer institutionalized means of succeeding.

For example, societies that value higher education as a way to advance in the workplace must make educational opportunity available to everyone.

Just as some people believe that the concept of God could not exist without the concept of the devil, deviance helps us affirm and define our own norms. Clarification of right and wrong: Sentencing a thief to prison affirms our culturally held value that stealing is wrong.

Responses to deviance can bring people closer together. When a student cheats on a test and receives a failing grade for the course, the rest of the class learns that cheating is wrong and will not be tolerated.

Affirmation of cultural norms and values: There was a surge in patriotic feeling and a sense of social unity among the citizens of the United States. Seeing a person punished for a deviant act reinforces what a society sees as acceptable or unacceptable behavior.

Not everyone has access to institutionalized means, or legitimate ways of achieving success. Strain Theory of Deviance Sometimes people find that when they attempt to attain culturally approved goals, their paths are blocked.

Strain theory, developed by sociologist Robert Merton, posits that when people are prevented from achieving culturally approved goals through institutional means, they experience strain or frustration that can lead to deviance. He said that they also experience anomie, or feelings of being disconnected from society, which can occur when people do not have access to the institutionalized means to achieve their goals.

Cloward and Ohlin argued that if people were dissatisfied with what they had, what they earned, or where they lived, they would be motivated to work harder to improve their circumstances.Read this essay on Functionalist Theories of Crime and Deviance.

Come browse our large digital warehouse of free sample essays. rest on an economic and structural analysis of society that sees a class struggle between the proletariat and the bourgeoisie. This struggle comprises the attempts by the proletariat to free themselves from the.

A Summary of Durkheim’s Functionalist Theory of why crime is necessary and functional for society. Three of Durkheim’s Key Ideas About Crime A limited amount of crime is necessary Crime has positive functions On the other hand, too much crime is Continue reading →.

All Structuralist theories of crime and deviance seem to suggest that crime is socially constructed rather than focused on the individual. Albert Cohen, combining Structuralist and sub cultural theories drew on Merton’s idea of strain but criticized Merton’s ideas of crime being an individual response and believed that he ignored non-utilitarian crimes.

Structuralist Theories of Crime Crime and deviance can only be explained by looking at the way societies are organised socially - their social structures and crime is caused by structures in society rather than by the circumstances of the individual. All Structuralist theories of crime and deviance seem to suggest that crime is socially constructed rather than focused on the individual.

Albert Cohen, combining Structuralist and sub cultural theories drew on Merton's idea of strain but criticized Merton's ideas of crime being an individual response and believed that he ignored non-utilitarian crimes.

Another framework sociologists use to understand the world is the structural functional theory. Its central idea is that society is a complex unit, made up of interrelated parts.

Its central idea is that society is a complex unit, made up of interrelated parts.

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An analysis of the structuralist theories of crime and deviance
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